Julie - 9 of 20

May 26th – Workshops, Tibetan Museum, Cultural Dinner

I asked what the Tibetans called the act of carving wood during my workshop and it is called, “Shing Koi”. I also had someone write it for me in Tibetan and from their writing I tried to copy their pencil strokes on my own with a calligraphy pen. My wood design was of a lotus flower, which is one of the auspicious symbols.

Wood carving and prayer wheels.
Wood carving and prayer wheels.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Later, while walking around in the mountains we came across some prayer wheels. These are fairly common in this region. Prayer wheels are cylindrical drums with Tibetan script engraved around the outside of the drum. Each drum is attached to a rod and has a small handle on the bottom of the drum so that it can be spun. As you walk by the prayer wheels you spin them one by one.

Tibet Museum
Tibet Museum

 

At the Tibetan museum I was able to gather, from the signage around the museum, what the numbers zero through nine look like and what parenthesis look like as well.

At the dinner I met a few Tibetans, one of them was a nun, and I was able to ask them their names and the meanings of their names. I find it interesting what names mean in other cultures. Labsang, for example, means “good mind”.